above the original lite brite toy lite brite was one

Fits Original Rectangular Lite Brite (Model 5455) 9in x 12in with round ..

The Original Lite Brite

Too low to display
  • Review
  • TAG : qx_06618_Flatscreen_Brite Author: Bethany_Rhodes Created Date:
ADD TO CART
  • The original Lite Brite looks much like a small television, approximately a foot square, with a back-lit plastic board for a screen that enables children to plug in colored pegs to make illuminated pictures. The pegs are blue, clear, green, orange, pink, purple, red and yellow.

    The original Lite Brite wasn't self healing, and as a result, had to be used with those silly paper pattern sheets with the dots on them. I was ...

  • The original Lite Brite, released by Hasbro in 1969 along with pre-patterned picture sheets (sold separately), allowed children to light their bedrooms with pictures of popular television and movie characters. It gained great popularity in the 1980s and offered picture templates of characters such as Scooby-Doo, Mickey Mouse, Mr. Potato Head and Darth Vader, among others.

    The image below shows you what the original Lite Brite looked like. The iPad version features more colors, touchscreen support (obviously) and increases image resolution a million-fold. Okay, maybe not a million-fold, but it’s a significant increase, to be sure.

    What's a LiteBrite?
    Check out this fabulous page for a description of and the history of the original LiteBrite child's toy: Yesterdayland page on LiteBrite
    Here's how our LiteBrite works...
    Our LiteBrite is a scaled up version of the child's toy, standing 6' tall by 8' wide, and shaped like a triangular prism. It uses colored acrylic rod for pegs which fluoresce under blacklight. There are a series of blacklight tubes in the cavity. In 2002, our LiteBrite will have a back that's painted white to mimic the original toy. The front panel is made from 1" spacing pegboard, covered with black masking tape, so that when a peg is punched through the paper, it lights up in brilliant fluorescent colors, just like in the original toy.
    Building the LiteBrite in 2001
    In The Beginning... In the end... Side View
    We intended to burn the LiteBrite at the end of the 2001 Burning Man art festival. We did not model a shell, nor adorn the LiteBrite in any way because we didn’t want to add anything potentially toxic to the fire. As it turns out, so many people stopped to play and then share their stories with us, stories of childhood LiteBrite fun or just personal stories relating who they are, that we didn’t have the heart to destroy it. Instead, we wanted our LiteBrite to live on in our home community and to further its impact.
    Notes from our community...

    Michaela Greeley

    Donald Burbano

  • What's a LiteBrite?
    Check out this fabulous page for a description of and the history of the original LiteBrite child's toy: Yesterdayland page on LiteBrite
    Here's how our LiteBrite works...
    Our LiteBrite is a scaled up version of the child's toy, standing 6' tall by 8' wide, and shaped like a triangular prism. It uses colored acrylic rod for pegs which fluoresce under blacklight. There are a series of blacklight tubes in the cavity. In 2002, our LiteBrite will have a back that's painted white to mimic the original toy. The front panel is made from 1" spacing pegboard, covered with black masking tape, so that when a peg is punched through the paper, it lights up in brilliant fluorescent colors, just like in the original toy.
    Building the LiteBrite in 2001
    In The Beginning... In the end... Side View
    We intended to burn the LiteBrite at the end of the 2001 Burning Man art festival. We did not model a shell, nor adorn the LiteBrite in any way because we didn’t want to add anything potentially toxic to the fire. As it turns out, so many people stopped to play and then share their stories with us, stories of childhood LiteBrite fun or just personal stories relating who they are, that we didn’t have the heart to destroy it. Instead, we wanted our LiteBrite to live on in our home community and to further its impact.
    Notes from our community...

    Michaela Greeley

    Donald Burbano

     


    All images copyright to the respective photographers.

    The original Lite Brite wasn't self healing, and as a result, had to be used with those silly paper pattern sheets with the dots on them. I was ...

Lite-Brite Magic Screen - Toys"R"Us

You trace out areas of the “canvas” with your finger, laying down digital push pins of assorted colors as you go. In the end, you should have a somewhat recognizable image or message on the iBrite screen. It’s pretty simple. Almost as simple as the original Lite Brite toy.