1847 kirsanovs doble steam car for steam car for sale

1924 Doble Touring Car

Doble Steam Cars

Too low to display
  • Review
  • TAG : Story of Doble Car by Andy Patterson - Steam Car Club
ADD TO CART
  • For all their innovations, Doble cars were hindered by two significant problems. The first was the price: the chassis alone sold for $9500, and adding a body virtually doubled that figure, making the car a luxury item in the 1920s. In 1922 the brothers had begun work on a lower cost model, projected to sell for less than $2000. This was named the Simplex, and was to be powered by four uniflow single-acting cylinders. One prototype is known to have been constructed, but the car never approached production stage. The other problem was Abner Doble himself, who was said to be such a perfectionist that he was seldom willing to stop tinkering and actually release an automobile for sale.

    For all their innovations, Doble cars were hindered by two significant problems. The first was the price: the chassis alone sold for $9500, and adding a body virtually doubled that figure, making the car a luxury item in the 1920s. In 1922 the brothers had begun work on a lower cost model, projected to sell for less than $2000. This was named the Simplex, and was to be powered by four uniflow single-acting cylinders. One prototype is known to have been constructed, but the car never approached production stage. The other problem was Abner Doble himself, who was said to be such a perfectionist that he was seldom willing to stop tinkering and actually release an automobile for sale.

  • The 1924 model Doble Series E steam car could run for 1,500 miles (2,400 km) before its 24-gallon water tank needed to be refilled; even in freezing weather, it could be started from cold and move off within 30 seconds, and once fully warmed could be relied upon to reach speeds in excess of 90 miles per hour (140 km/h). In recent years Doble cars have been run at speeds approaching 120 mph (190 km/h), this without the benefits of streamlining, and a stripped down version of the Series E accelerated from 0 - 75 mph (121 km/h) in 10 seconds. Its fuel consumption, burning a variety of fuels (often kerosene), was competitive with automobiles of the day, and its ability to run in eerie silence apart from wind noise gave it a distinct edge. At 70 mph (110 km/h), there was little noticeable vibration, with the engine turning at around 900 rpm.

    The 1924 model Doble Series E steam car could run for 1,500 miles (2,400 km) before its 24-gallon water tank needed to be refilled; even in freezing weather, it could be started from cold and move off within 30 seconds, and once fully warmed could be relied upon to reach speeds in excess of 90 miles per hour (140 km/h). In recent years Doble cars have been run at speeds approaching 120 mph (190 km/h), this without the benefits of streamlining, and a stripped down version of the Series E accelerated from 0 - 75 mph (121 km/h) in 10 seconds. Its fuel consumption, burning a variety of fuels (often kerosene), was competitive with automobiles of the day, and its ability to run in eerie silence apart from wind noise gave it a distinct edge. At 70 mph (110 km/h), there was little noticeable vibration, with the engine turning at around 900 rpm.

    • 1 Featured 1924 Doble Touring Car
    • 2 Steam Cars Picture Gallery
    • 3 Steam Powered Cars
    • 4 Related Pages

  • Quote »
    "Abner Doble learned the unfortunate lesson that you can do everything right and still not succeed.
    Early automobile manufacturers had to decide on the source of energy to power the automobile: steam, electric or gasoline. Against the prevailing and growing dominance of the gasoline engine, Abner Doble gambled on steam.
    Doble built his first steam car while still in high school. He left the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to pursue his dream of building the finest steam car in the world. By 1918 he had built 80 steam cars in Detroit. In 1920, Doble and his brothers, all engineers, moved their steam car business to Emeryville, California, where they built 42 additional cars before being forced out of business because of changing consumer demands in America.
    Although history has proven that Doble made the wrong choice, his steam-powered cars were engineering marvels of the day. The 1924 model Doble steam car, which could run for 1,500 miles on a 24-gallon tank, had a flash boiler the could produce a working head of steam in one minute. It was a luxury car that film stars and royalty were proud to own.
    When the gasoline powered car finally triumphed, Doble traveled the world as a steam power consultant. "

    These improvements promised a steam car that would at last provide virtually all of the convenience associated with a conventional automobile, but with higher speed, simpler controls, and what was a virtually noiseless power plant. The only defect sometimes noted throughout the Doble car era was less than perfect braking, which was common in automobiles of all types before 1930. Typically, a car of 1920s only had two rear-mounted mechanical drum brakes, although those fitted to Dobles were of larger than usual proportions. Dobles achieved reliability by eliminating most of the mechanical items that tended to malfunction in conventional automobiles: they had no , no , no , no . Later Doble steam cars often achieved several hundred thousand miles of use before a major mechanical service was necessary

Doble Steam Car - Tractor & Construction Plant Wiki - Wikia

In 1914 Mr. Doble drove one of his cars to Detroit where he found financial backing and produced the Doble Detroit car, an investment would probably be jealous of today. The Doble Detroit was the first Doble to use a forced draft burner. It also used two-cylinder double acting uniflow engine of Doble's design. Doble had obtained capital to get a company going making steam cars but World War I was on and the government refused to give the Doble company an allotment of steel. The project thus failed and Doble returned to California, later in 1920 establishing with his brothers the Doble Steam Motor factory in Emeryville.